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A Man & His Cat Recreate Classic Movie Scenes

Some people love their cats perhaps a bit too much… By Greta J and the mad geniuses at Bored Panda.

“David and Sarah, a couple from the UK, are recreating famous movie scenes together with their cats and it couldn’t get any funnier! They have two cats who are almost identical named Willow and Tara, but Tara stars in most of their pictures. “We started doing it as a picture question in our pub quiz’s film/TV round, and it went down really well so we made it a regular thing,” – the couple told The Dodo.

“The cats clearly think we’re weird. It can be a challenge to get [the cats] to cooperate, but they get lots of treats so that tends to win them over to our nonsense,” Sarah and David told LoveMeow.

The good news for the movie and feline lovers is that there’s more pictures to come! “We’re going to keep making them. It’s a hilarious way to spend a Sunday!”

#1 E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

#2 Alien

Alien

#3 Ghost

Ghost

#4 The Shining

The Shining

#5 American Beauty

American Beauty

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Popular R-Rated Films Turned into a Children’s Book by Josh Cooley

This Pixar Artist Took Your Favorite R-Rated Films and Turned Them Into a Children’s Book by Zak Cheney-Rice at http://www.policymic.com/articles/82665/this-pixar-artist-took-your-favorite-r-rated-films-and-turned-them-into-a-children-s-book

For years, Josh Cooley worked as a storyboard artist at Pixar Animation Studios. His illustrations laid the blueprint for such family classics as The Incredibles (2004), Ratatouille (2007), and Up (2009). But on Feb. 25, he’ll try his hand at the publishing game with a new book entitled Movies R Fun!: A Collection of Cinematic Classics for the Pre-(Film) School Cinephile. So far, it looks pretty awesome.

 

this, pixar, artist, took, your, favorite, r-rated, films, and, turned, them, into, a, children's, book,

This Pixar Artist Took Your Favorite R-Rated Films and Turned Them Into a Children’s Book
Image Credit: Josh Cooley

Cooley’s book takes a series of iconic scenes, moments, and images from well-known R-rated and adult-themed films, and renders them in his trademark child-friendly style. The result has been advertised as a “hilariously inappropriate” “children’s picture book parody for grown-ups.” From Pulp Fiction and Fight Club to The Shining and Rosemary’s Baby, few classics are spared the Cooley treatment. Here are some excerpts, via Josh Cooley:

Pulp Fiction:

Predator:

Fight Club:

The Blues Brothers:

Alien:

Jaws:

Drive:

2001: A Space Odyssey

The Road Warrior:

The Big Lebowski:

American Beauty:

A Clockwork Orange:

Chinatown:

 Goodfellas:

The Terminator:

The Godfather:

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Rosemary’s Baby

The Graduate:

The Professional:

The Godfather, Part II:

The Shining:

The Silence of the Lambs:

Apocalypse Now:

Seven:

The Big Lebowski:

Psycho:

Fargo:

No Country for Old Men:

Die Hard:

Donnie Darko:

Pan’s Labyrinth:

Magical movie moments. Two especially disturbing highlights are illustrations depicting the notorious “chest-burster” scene from Alien (1979), and the classic scene in The Godfather(1972) when a character wakes up to find the severed head of his prized racehorse in his bed.

Cooley’s book also captures some solid iconic lines to go with his illustrations. Examples include:

“’You want a toe? I can get you a toe,’ said Walter. ‘Hell, I can get you a toe by 3 p.m. this afternoon, with nail polish.’” – from The Big Lebowski (1997)

“’It rubs the lotion on its skin, or else it gets the hose again,’ explained Buffalo Bill.” – from The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

“’Yippee-Kay-Yay mother#@&*$$%!’ said John McClane.” – from Die Hard (1988)

And so on. The children’s book parody genre had a major success in 2011 with the now-infamous Go the F**k to Sleep, by Adam Mansbach and Ricardo Cortés. That book even received the Samuel L. Jackson treatment, which one could say should be the litmus test for any future classic. Based on these preview images, Josh Cooley’s upcoming work has the potential to be a similar cult favorite down the road. Meanwhile, fans will have to make do with this sneak peak.


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Famous Movie Puppets

This post was inspired by Matthew Ponsford’s CNN article at http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/08/showbiz/10-greatest-movie-puppets/index.html. The first ten puppet writeups below are from him. I have added my own commentary and five additional classic movie puppets. Enjoy.

01Kermit

Kermit the Frog
Originally fashioned from a green ladies coat that Jim Henson found in a bin (plus a pair of ping pong balls for eyes), Kermit the Frog has gone on to be one of the world’s few internationally recognized puppets — or, rather, Muppets. He can already count seven hit films, a recording contract, a bestselling autobiography and countless TV appearances among his achievements –and he’s set to appear on the big screen again next year in “Muppets Most Wanted.”

Henry: Superb choice. Kermit and the Muppets are quintessential puppets.

02Yoda

Yoda
Despite being a three foot green alien puppet, Jedi Master Yoda manages to give off a convincing impression of wisdom and deliver some of the “Star Wars” saga’s most crucial lines. George Lucas drafted in legendary Jim Henson-collaborator Frank Oz to bring the elderly Jedi to life, a choice which ensured Yoda had a sense of humor to match his worldly knowledge.

Henry: “Judge me by my size, do you?” Excellent choice.

03ET

ET
When Steven Spielberg chose to create a heart-warming alien story for children, the easy option would have been to cast a cute and cuddly puppet. Instead audiences got waddling, faintly frightening E.T. But Spielberg’s instincts were proven correct again, as the film went on to become the highest-grossing film ever released (at that time).

Henry: “Phone home.” Excellent choice. Plus, he likes Reese’s Pieces.

04Gizmo

Gizmo
Audiences loved “Gremlins” adorable mogwai Gizmo — but the puppeteers did not. The tiny rubber puppet was prone to malfunctioning and so frustrated the crew that they added a scene in which the creature gets strapped to a dartboard and pelted with darts.

Henry: Dry clean only. Excellent choice.

05Pinocchio

Pinocchio
Cinema’s most famous puppet — no strings attached. Animation, rather than puppetry, brought “real boy” Pinocchio to the world — famously in the Walt Disney classic, and later to a new generation (this time CGI) in an oddball turn in Shrek. Live-action adaptations of the classic novel by Tim Burton and Guillermo Del Toro are rumored to be in the pipeline.

Henry: Not a movie puppet per se, but a character that’s a puppet. Well played, sir.

06Chucky

Chucky
Puppets can be terrifying too. Case in point: Chucky, the “Good Guy” doll possessed by the spirit of a serial killer in the movie “Child’s Play.” The mixture of childlike puppets and murderous violence provoked controversy — with protesters claiming Chucky made children violent — but the film’s popularity was not damaged. It has since spawned five sequels.

Henry: Arguably the most bad-ass of all movie puppets. Excellent choice.

07Ludo

Ludo
When teenage babysitter Sarah is transported to Labyrinth’s strange maze-world (populated by Jim Henson’s puppet creations), she is helped by kind-hearted hairy beast Ludo, who sees her through the quest to recover her baby brother. The cumbersome puppet was operated by puppeteers underneath the monster suit, who could watch events unfolding on a TV screen inside Ludo’s stomach.

Henry: “Rocks friends.” One of the best characters in this movie, along with the young but already lovely Jennifer Connelly. Excellent choice.

08RedBalloon

The Red Balloon
Not all of cinema’s finest puppetry makes use of such complex animatronics. Albert LamorisseIt managed to turn a helium balloon (with a mind of its own) into the joint-protagonist of his classic short film “The Red Balloon.”

Henry: A classic movie from my childhood. A bit of a stretch calling a balloon a puppet, though. 

09Alien

Alien
It’s just a few seconds of cameo, but makes a big impression and turns the film on its head. Not even the cast members (who were left in the dark about what was about to take place) were expecting the titular “Alien” to burst out of John Hurt’s chest. The shock of the creature’s arrival disguises the fact that what we’re looking at is actually a relatively simple puppet — and a whole load of blood from a butcher’s shop.

Henry: I hate when that happens. They made Alien vs. Predator, so how about Alien vs. Chucky: Battle of the Puppets?

10KimJongIl

Kim Jong Il
Even after the advent of photorealistic CGI, puppetry isn’t dead — in part thanks to South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, whose clumsy marionettes in “Team America: World Police” satirized Hollywood’s slick action blockbusters. But it’s the film’s villain — then Korean leader Kim Jong Il — who steals the show.

Henry: How can you not love a marionette version of one-third of the Axis of Evil? Excellent choice.

I’d like to add the following honorable mentions that failed to make Mr. Ponsford’s list:

Gerry Anderson death

The Thunderbirds
Per Wikipedia: Thunderbirds is a 1960s British science-fiction television series, created by Gerry and Sylvia Anderson. Filmed between 1964 and 1966, it was produced using marionette puppetry interwoven with scale-model special effects sequences, in the form of a mixed technique dubbed “Supermarionation”.

Henry: I suspect Parker & Stone got some inspiration from The Thunderbirds. Either way, I can tell you is that this was one of my favorite TV shows growing up. The vehicle designs still look fresh after 40 years. THAT is good design work.

11Skeksis

Skeksis
Per Wikipedia: The Dark Crystal is a 1982 American–British fantasy film directed by Jim Henson and Frank Oz. The plot revolves around Jen, an elflike ‘Gelfling’ on a quest to restore balance to his alien world by returning a lost shard to a powerful but broken gem. Although marketed as a family film, it was notably darker than the creators’ previous material. The animatronics used in the film were considered groundbreaking. The primary concept artist was the fantasy illustrator Brian Froud, famous for his distinctive faerie and dwarf designs.

Henry: The image above is of an evil Skeksis, but the movie is filled with other delightful creatures, including: Mystics, Landstriders, Podlings, Gelfings, Garthim, and Aughra, the lovable ogre-witch with one removable eye.

14Critters

Critters
Per Wikipedia: Critters is a 1986 cult comedy horror science fiction film. The film begins on a prison asteroid in outer space. A group of unseen creatures known as Crites are set to be transported to another station. When the seemingly intelligent creatures cause an explosion that kills two guards and injures three, hijack a ship away from the station, and escape, the leader of the station hires two transforming bounty hunters to hunt the “Critters” down.

Henry: The seemingly contradictory description “cult comedy horror science fiction” aptly summarizes this movie. Definitely worth a rent by any self-respecting horror or sci-fi fan.

15SesameSt

Sesame Street
Henry: Do I really need to explain this one? Bert, Ernie, Grover, Oscar the Grouch, Big Bird, and the Cookie Monster belong in the top ten! We were robbed!

13MeetTheFeebles

Meet the Feebles
Per Wikipedia: Meet the Feebles is a 1989 New Zealand black comedy film directed by Peter Jackson. It features Jim Henson-esque puppets in a perverse comic satire. Like Henson’s Muppets, the Feebles are animal-figured puppets (plus some people in suits) who are members of a stage troupe. However, whereas Henson’s Muppets characterize positivity, naïve folly, and innocence, the Feebles present negativity, vice, and other misanthropic characteristics.

Henry: This movie makes the list as a nod to the great Peter Jackson making films before he had 9-digit movie budgets.


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Infographic: Sci-Fi, Fantasy & Horror Movies Related to The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings is one of my favorite books, and I was thinking about the movie version. It struck me that many of the actors in “The Lord of the Rings” also appear in other speculative fiction (science fiction, fantasy & horror) movies. Hugo Weaving plays Elrond, but he’s also Agent Smith in “The Matrix”. Christopher Lee plays Saruman, but also appears in “Star Wars” and billions of other movies. You get the idea.

Then I recalled the Six Degrees of Separation theory. So, starting from the Tolkien fan epicenter that is “The Lord of the Rings”, I plotted out how tightly connected by their actors speculative fiction movie are. Below is an infographic that shows an initial answer. I intentionally limited the scope of my inquiry. One could easily expand the network to be more inclusive.

Instructions:
1. Click on the image below to expand the infographic. If it’s still too small, use the View-Zoom In feature of your web browser.
2. Start in the center at “The Lord of the Rings” & “The Hobbit”. Move either right or left to the actor of your choice. Then keep moving horizontally right (or left) to see how these actors link to other speculative fiction movies, and so on.
For example, Karl Urban played Eomer in “The Lord of the Rings”. He was also in “Star Trek”, as was Zoe Saldana. She was in “Avatar”, as was Sam Worthington.  And Sam was in “Clash of the Titans”.

Caveats:
1. I don’t doubt that there are mistakes or omissions. There is no need to email me and remind me of my fallibility. There is no money-back guarantee. Well, since this is free, I guess I can offer a full refund if you’re not fully satisfied.
2. A single asterisk denotes that I couldn’t help myself, and included a few select TV shows. Whatcha gonna do?
3. A double asterisk denotes that I couldn’t help myself, and included a few non-speculative fiction movies. So sue me.
4. As in any network, there can be more than one path to get from one node (movie) to another. I’ve just shown single paths.
5. This infographic is in NO way represented as exhaustive, although creating it was exhausting.
6. If you enjoy it, kindly Retweet (@Nimpentoad) or otherwise share the link with friends you think would appreciate it (or send it to enemies who would not appreciate it, but who you wish to annoy).

Click on the image below to expand it.

LOTRinfographic