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Children's & Fantasy/Sci-Fi Books


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Russian Fairy Tales Brought to Life

As an author of fractured fairy tales, this speaks to me. Haunting recreations of Russian fairy tales, thanks to Margarita Kareva and the mad geniuses at Bored Panda.

“I started taking pictures about 5 years ago, had not even suspected that it will be my profession. Since then, I often say thanks to the Universe for giving me a passion for my life.

I love to read since childhood, and perhaps my love of reading has made me a dreamer and a person living in their fantasies.

And I’m glad that I had a way to play out my fantasies with the camera. It is very important for every person – to have their own way of expression.

My way – is to share photos from a fairy tales. Photos with unusual models, with animals, with a combination of quaint colors.

Most of the photos in my portfolio is a creative photography (noncommercial) because I think it is very important to do something that you really like.”

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

 Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds

Little Fairy Worlds


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Who Says Fae Aren’t Real?

With the recent release of my urban fantasy bedtime picture book, MABEL AND THE QUEEN OF DREAMS, from Schiffer Publishing, I’m always on the lookout for fun images featuring fairies or other fae. Here are some real world Fae from Karolina Skorek and the mad geniuses at Bored Panda.

“I present you part of my photographic series, called “Tales”.

I always loved creating stories. All of the images were always in my head, and they’ve been itching to get out and be told (or shown in my case) to others. They are a mixture of history, and mythology, hugely influenced by my cultural back-ground, and my belief system.

I was born in Poland, and since early days I was affected by traditional legends and stories. Soon I discovered that they are part of fantastic Slavic Culture I had the luck to be born in. In them everything was connected to the force of nature. Everything had purpose and meaning. All of those stories had strong female characters in them; wise women who knew how to heal with herbs and energy, goddesses, fairies, spirits and many more. Everything was in perfect balance.

Those tales run in my blood. They are visible in every artwork I create. I invite you to step into the world of nature, magic and energy. Where everything is the opposite of what it appears to be, and nothing is the opposite of what it appears to be.”


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Meet the Monsters – Ogres

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Meet the Monsters is a web series providing background on the mythological creatures featured in MONSTER GOOSE NURSERY RHYMES.

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Ogres

Ogres are featured in mythology and folklore throughout the world. They are large, strong, dimwitted and dangerous humanoids who eat humans. Giants, trolls, and ogres are sometimes represented as the other in fiction. For example, Tolkien refers to the ogre-like creatures in THE HOBBIT and THE LORD OF THE RINGS as trolls.

The term ogre has several possible origins. In the Bible, Og is the giant Amorite king of Bashan. The Etruscans worshiped a cannibalistic god Orcus. Greek mythology includes the river god Oiagros, father of Orpheus. A female ogre is called an ogress. Or perhaps real-world Neanderthals, which coexisted with Cro-Magnons, were the original inspiration for ogres.

ogre01 Per the New World Encyclopedia, “Another explanation for the ogre myth is that the ogres represent the remains of the forefather-cult which was ubiquitous in Scandinavia until the introduction of Christianity in the tenth and eleventh centuries. In this cult, the forefathers were worshiped in sacred groves, by altars, or by grave mounds. They believed that after death a person’s spirit continued to live on, or near, the family farm. This particularly applied to the founding-father of the estate, over whose body a large burial mound was constructed.”

Ogres appear in the movies Shrek, in the tabletop games Dungeons & Dragons, Magic: The Gathering, and Warhammer, and in the books PUSS IN BOOTS, HOP O’ MY THUMB and, SLEEPING BEAUTY (original version) by Charles Perrault, THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA by C.S. Lewis, XANTH by Piers Anthony, THE SPIDERWICK CHRONICLES by Holly Black & Tony DiTerlizzi, and MONSTER GOOSE NURSERY RHYMES by Henry Herz.

ogre2Puss in Boots before the ogre. Note that one of the platters on the table serves human babies (Illustrated by Gustave Doré).

ogre3Hop-o’-My-Thumb steals the ogre’s seven-league boots. (Illustrated by Gustave Doré.)

ogre4Kwakiutl house pole representing the cannibal ogress Dzonoqwa

ogre5Oni (Japanese ogre)

ogre6The ogre from “Hop-o’-My-Thumb” at Efteling

ogre7The ogress Sanda Muhki represented at Mandalay Hill

 


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Fairy-Tale Scenes With Live Animals

From photographer Darya Kondratyeva and the mad geniuses at Bored Panda. Where can I get my own bear?

“When Moscow-based photographer Darya Kondratyeva isn’t snapping family, maternity or baby photos, she creates enchanting photos that seem like re-interpretations of old fairytales or legends. The models in her photos seem like they could be witches, princesses or forest spirits.

Aside from her models, trained animals feature heavily in Kondratyeva’s fantasy photography as well. Each one seems like it might open its mouth and whisper a wise secret into the model’s ear.”

 


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Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes is Now Available

We are absolutely delighted to announce that our fantasy picture book, Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes, has just been released by Pelican Publishing.

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Enter an enchanted land of mythical creatures where manticores reign and ogres roar. With a unique twist on traditional rhymes, Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes presents a darker approach to these childhood classics, and yet the sing-song nature of the poems renders them playful and jovial at the same time. Little Witch Muffet is not frightened by a silly, little spider; she adds him to her stew! If you enjoy mischief and have a penchant for the morbidly hilarious, the rhymes will satisfy your mythological curiosity. The book also includes a “bestiary” with information about the book’s legendary creatures.

The book has garnered widespread praise, including:

This distinctive collection deserves to be enjoyed year round.
Publishers Weekly

For all of us who grew up loving Dungeons & Dragons and Tolkien, Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes is an excellent way to introduce our little ones to the world of fantasy!”
Drew Daywalt, author of the New York Times bestseller The Day the Crayons Quit

Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes is an inventive welcome to the traditional rhymes we all grew up with. Both kids and adults, whose interest are a bit dark and creepy and off the beaten path, will revel in the rhymes’ inventive dark humor. Bravo!
Dan Yaccarino, author and illustrator of Unlovable, Doug Unplugged, and more

Monstrously clever—I’d rather Mary had a hippogriff than a ‘little lamb’ any day!
Molly Idle, Caldecott Honor winning illustrator of Flora and the Flamingo, Tea Rex, and more

“Monstrously clever and soon to be schoolyard standards.”
Tara Lazar, author of The Monstore, I Thought This Was a Bear Book, and more

Love fantasy? Know any kids? Get a copy

Animoto_PeterPeter Animoto_WitchMuffet

 


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The True Stories Behind Classic Fairy Tales

This fascinating piece is by Valerie Ogden at The Huffington Post.

Fairy tales, gripping, magical and inspiring, are master narratives. Children subconsciously recall their messages as they grow older, and are forced to cope with real injustices and contradictions in their lives. Some fairy tales are based on legends that incorporated a spiritual belief of the culture in which they originated, and were meant to emulate truth.

Numerous fairy tales, and the legends behind them, are actually watered-down versions of uncomfortable historical events. These darker stories might be too terrifying for today’s little lambkins, as well as some adults! Their horrific origins, which often involve rape, incest, torture, cannibalism and other hideous occurrences, are brimming with sophisticated and brutal morality. Their images cannot be dispelled easily and their lessons are more powerful than the present-day, innocuous fables they resemble.

In the early 1800’s Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm collected stories that depicted the unpredictable and often unforgiving life experienced by central Europeans. These brothers, determined to preserve the Germanic oral story telling that was vanishing, poured over the folklore of the region. Their first collection of stories was based on actual, gruesome events. However, they had to provide lighter interpretations of these factual incidents in order to sell books. Consequently they paid attention to previously printed fairytales, particularly those of Charles Perrault. As early as the 17th century, this Frenchman who is thought to be the father of fairy tales, created some of the most imaginative and delightful stories ever told. His confabulations of a pumpkin carriage and Fairy Godmother in Cinderella, for example, are magnificently enchanting. His original Cinderella, based on a true story, contains violent elements as well, since the wicked stepsisters butcher their own feet while trying to get into the slipper that the Prince had found.

Perrault’s tales, albeit charming, were unsentimental; for they were intended for adults, because no children’s literature existed at the time. His suspense story, BLUEBEARD, reads like a crime thriller, with the bloody knives and curious dead wives, his moral, that women should be less nosy, apparent. Perrault based his fairy tale on two accounts of dark depravity in Brittany, France. The earlier of the two accounts dealt with a savage, 6th century ruler. The second detailed the acts of a nobleman, named Gilles de Rais, who tortured, mutilated, raped and murdered hundreds of innocent children. My book explores the life and crimes of this tragic, historic figure.

The almost barbaric episodes that follow are just a smattering of fairy tales, as we know them today, derived from spoken legends which were based on facts. The morals these stories convey are far more important than the events themselves, the circumstances of which are often forgotten. These cautionary tales, where good conquers evil, the wicked get punished, the righteous live happily ever after, offer hope that one can do something positive about changing oneself and the world.

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Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
The fairy tale is based on the tragic life of Margarete von Waldeck, a 16th century Bavarian noblewoman. Margarete grew up in Bad Wildungen, where her brother used small children to work his copper mine. Severely deformed because of the physical labor mining required, they were despairingly referred to as dwarfs. The poison apple is also rooted in fact; an old man would offer tainted fruits to the workers, and other children he believed stole from him.

Margarete’s stepmother, despising her, sent the beauty, to the Brussels court to get rid of her. There Prince Philip II of Spain became her steamy lover. His father, the king of Spain, opposing the romance, dispatched Spanish agents to murder Margarete. They surreptitiously poisoned her.

rapunzel

Rapunzel
Rapunzel draws upon an early Christian story. In the third century A.D. a prosperous pagan merchant, living in Asia Minor, so adored his beautiful daughter he forbade her to have suitors. Accordingly he locked her in a tower when he traveled. There is no mention how hair became important, but she converted to Christianity, praying so loudly when the merchant left, her devotions reverberated throughout town. The merchant, informed of her actions, dragged her before the Roman pro-consul who insisted the father behead her or forfeit his fortune if she should refuse to give up her newfound religion. The father decapitated her but was killed by a lightning strike soon after. She became the martyr, Saint Barbara, revered by the Eastern Orthodox Church.

Bluebeard
Perrault wove his story around Conomor the Cursed, the Breton chief who had been forewarned he would be slain by his own son. As soon as one of his wives became pregnant, he murdered her. But Perrault was more fascinated by Gilles de Rais, a wealthy 15th century nobleman, a hero of the Hundred Years’ War, Joan of Arc’s protector on the battlefield. After he left the military he became a notorious serial killer of children. He was given the nickname, Bluebeard, because his horse’s sleek fur looked blue in the daylight. At his shocking trial, he described in detail how he had preyed upon and tortured innocent children. Perrault drew upon these facts to conjure up his own nightmarish character.

hansel

Hansel and Gretel
The tale of Hansel and Gretel could have been told to keep children from wandering off. But during the great famine of 1315-1317 A. D. that crushed most of continental Europe and England, disease, mass death, infanticide and cannibalism increased exponentially. Seeking relief, some desperate parents deserted their children and slaughtered their draft animals.

Or Hansel and Gretel might have stumbled upon the home of the successful baker, Katharina Schraderin. In the 1600s, she concocted such a scrumptious ginger bread cookie that a jealous male baker accused her of being a witch. After being driven from town, a posse of angry neighbors hunted her down, brought her back to her home, and burned her to death in her own oven.

Little Jack Horner
This story matches events in the life of Bishop Richard Whiting of Glastonbury and his steward, who was perhaps named Jack Horner. When King Henry VIII broke away from the Catholic Church and dissolved its Monasteries in England, Glastonbury remained the sole religious home in Somerset. Whiting, trying to keep the abbey, bribed the King by offering him twelve Catholic manorial estates. To thwart potential thieves, he hid the deeds to the estates in a pie crust. But the seventy-nine-year-old Bishop, convicted of treason for serving Rome, was drawn, quartered and hung at Glastonbury Tor overlooking the town. His “good” steward absconded with the plum deed to the Manor of Mells, and Horner’s descendants lived there until the 20th century.

The Pied Piper of Hamelin
In 1264, a pied piper had offered to get rid of the numerous rats in the Germanic village of Hamelin, as long as the town elders gave him a considerable amount of money upon the completion of this task. After he disposed of the rats, the elders reneged on their promise. Furious, the piper enticed the children of the village to follow him. They never returned.

Some believe the Piper led the innocents to the Mediterranean to join the Children’s Crusade leaving for the Holy Land. Presumably children would peacefully convert Moslems to Christianity after the Mediterranean rolled back, allowing their safe passage to Jerusalem. The Sea did not oblige, and many children starved to death waiting for the miracle to occur.

cinderella

Cinderella
That blond, fair-complexioned, but mistreated beauty in Perrault’s tale loosely relates to the history of Rhodopis, a Greek woman, whose name means “rosy-cheeked.” When she was a young girl, she was captured in Thrace, sold into slavery around 500 BC, and taken to Egypt.

Her unusual looks made her a treasured commodity, and her master showered her with gifts, including a pair of golden shoes. These shoes and Rhodopis were noticed by the Pharaoh, Ahmose II. He insisted she become one of his wives. While not his principal, revered partner, born of royal blood, she would still perform ceremonial functions and…mainly be readily available to gratify Ahmose sexually. Did her new found status offer her perpetual happiness? Probably not.

Valerie Ogden is the author of Bluebeard: Brave Warrior. Brutal Psychopath.

Click to Tweet: The True Stories Behind Classic Fairy Tales at http://wp.me/p31Xf4-Lb via @Nimpentoad


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Archers of Legend

With San Diego Comic-Con going on right now, it seems only fitting to take a look at some of the great archers of legend from novels, comics, manga, movies and video games.

Bard the Bowman (The Hobbit)

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Per wikipedia: “Later known as Bard I, he appears in The Hobbit. Bard of Esgaroth was a skilled archer and the heir of Girion, the last king of old Dale. He was described as “grim faced” and while a guardsman of Esgaroth he was often predicting floods and poisoned fish. He rallied the guards to defend the town when the dragon came. Bard was able to slay the dragon Smaug with the Black Arrow after a tip from the old thrush (who had overheard Bilbo Baggins’ description of Smaug) had revealed an unarmoured spot on the dragon’s underside. Bard claimed a twelfth of the treasure amassed by the dragon, which he subsequently shared with the Master of Esgaroth to rebuild the town, but the Master stole the money and ran off into the wild where he died. After its rebuilding, Bard was the first king (Bard I) of restored Dale, followed by his son Bain, grandson Brand, and great-grandson Bard II. In Peter Jackson’s three-part adaptation of The Hobbit, Bard is played by Welsh actor Luke Evans.”


 

Cupid (mythology)

cupid

Per wikipedia: “In classical mythology, Cupid (Latin Cupido, meaning “desire”) is the god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection. He is often portrayed as the son of the love goddess Venus, and is known in Latin also as Amor (“Love”). His Greek counterpart is Eros.”

“Although Eros appears in Classical Greek art as a slender winged youth, during the Hellenistic period, he was increasingly portrayed as a chubby boy. During this time, his iconography acquired the bow and arrow that represent his source of power: a person, or even a deity, who is shot by Cupid’s arrow is filled with uncontrollable desire. In myths, Cupid is a minor character who serves mostly to set the plot in motion.”


 

Daryl Dixon (The Walking Dead)

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Per wikipedia: “Daryl Dixon is a fictional character from the horror drama television series The Walking Dead, which airs on AMC in the United States and is based on the comic book series of the same name. He was created by writers Frank Darabont, Charles H. Eglee and Jack LoGiudice and is portrayed by Norman Reedus. The character was introduced in the first season as a Southern expert tracker who constantly lives in the shadow of his brother, Merle. Despite his ill temper and volatility, he is tolerated by the core group of survivors due to his skills in hunting animals and fearless efficiency in killing zombies (dubbed “walkers” in the series).”


 

Green Arrow (DC Comics)

greenarrow

Per wikipedia: “Green Arrow is a fictional superhero who appears in comic books published by DC Comics. Created by Morton Weisinger and designed by George Papp, he first appeared in More Fun Comics #73 in November 1941. His real name is Oliver Queen, a billionaire businessman and owner of Queen Industries, as well as a well-known celebrity in his locale of Star City. Sometimes shown dressed like Robin Hood, Green Arrow is an archer who invents trick arrows with various special functions, such as glue arrows, diversions (smoke), net, explosive, time bomb, grappling, fire extinguishing, flash, boomerang, tear gas arrows, cryonic arrows and even a kryptonite arrow. At the time of his debut, Green Arrow functioned in many ways as an archery-themed analogue of the very popular Batman character, but writers at DC subsequently developed him into a voice of progressivism very much distinct in character from Batman, with his own supporting cast.”


 

Hawkeye (Marvel Comics)

Per wikipedia: “Hawkeye (Clint Barton; also known as Goliath and Ronin) is a fictional character, a comic book superhero that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer Stan Lee and artist Don Heck, the character first appeared as a villain in Tales of Suspense #57 (Sept. 1964) and later joined the Avengers in Avengers #16 (May 1965). He has been a prominent member of the team ever since. He was also ranked at #44 on IGN’s Top 100 Comic Book Heroes list.”

“Hawkeye is portrayed by Jeremy Renner in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a shared fictional universe that is the setting of films produced by Marvel Studios. Renner first made an uncredited cameo appearance as Hawkeye in Thor (2011) and later reprised the role in The Avengers (2012); he is set to return to the role a third time in Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015).”


 

Katniss Everdeen (The Hunger Games)

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Per wikipedia: “Katniss Everdeen is a fictional character and the protagonist of The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins. Her name comes from an edible plant called katniss. Academy Award-winning actress Jennifer Lawrence portrayed Katniss in The Hunger Games films.”

“Katniss and her family come from District 12, a coal-mining district that is the poorest and least populated district in the dystopian fictional autocratic nation of Panem. In the course of the first book, The Hunger Games, Katniss volunteers to replace her sister, Primrose “Prim” Everdeen, after she is called forth during Reaping Day, a day in which, annually, one male and one female tribute between the ages of 12 to 18 are called forth from each district to fight to the death in an arena and only one person can come out alive from all 24 people in what are known as the Hunger Games.”


 

Legolas (The Lord of the Rings)

Legolas

Per wikipedia: “Legolas was the son of Thranduil, King of the Woodland Realm of Northern Mirkwood, who appears as “the Elvenking” in The Hobbit. Thranduil ruled over the Silvan Elves or “Wood-elves” of Mirkwood.”

“Although he lived among the Silvan Elves, Legolas was not one himself. His father Thranduil had originally come from Lindon; he and his son were actually Sindar, or ‘Grey Elves’.”

“Legolas was introduced in The Fellowship of the Ring, at the council of Elrond of Rivendell, where he came as a messenger from his father to discuss Gollum’s escape from their guard. Legolas was chosen to be a member of the Fellowship that intended to destroy the One Ring. He accompanied the other members in their travels from Rivendell to Amon Hen, serving as the group’s archer.”


 

Link (Legend of Zelda)

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Per wikipedia: “Link refers to several different incarnations of the same fictional character and the protagonist of Nintendo’s The Legend of Zelda series. Link has been featured in other media from Nintendo, including its merchandising, comic books, and a cartoon series.”

“Link is depicted as a child, teenager, or adult of the Hylian race, originating from the fictional land of Hyrule. Link often travels through Hyrule, defeating creatures, evil forces, and the series’ primary antagonist, Ganon, while attempting to save Princess Zelda and Hyrule. To defeat him, Link usually requires the mystic Master Sword and Light Arrows, or a similar legendary weapon, obtained after many trials and battles, and magical objects or using other items such as musical instruments and weaponry.”


 

Merida (Brave)

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Per wikipedia: “Princess Merida (Scottish Gaelic: Mèrida) is the main character from the 2012 Disney Pixar film Brave. Merida was added to the Disney Princess line-up as the 11th Princess and the first Pixar character in 2013.”

“Princess Merida is the 16-year old daughter of King Fergus and Queen Elinor, who rule their Scottish kingdom. Queen Elinor’s traditional expectations that Merida take a husband and become a proper royal lady come into conflict with the single-minded and impetuous Merida’s insistence that she control her own destiny. Merida has greatly perfected her skill in archery, and is one of the most skilled archers in the kingdom.”


 

Neytiri (Avatar)

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Per wikipedia: “To explore Pandora’s biosphere, scientists use Na’vi-human hybrids called “avatars”, operated by genetically matched humans; Jake Sully, a paraplegic former marine, replaces his deceased twin brother as an operator of one. Dr. Grace Augustine, head of the Avatar Program, considers Sully an inadequate replacement but accepts his assignment as a bodyguard. While protecting the avatars of Grace and scientist Norm Spellman as they collect biological data, Jake’s avatar is attacked by a thanator and flees into the forest, where he is rescued by Neytiri, a female Na’vi. Witnessing an auspicious sign, she takes him to her clan, whereupon Neytiri’s mother Mo’at, the clan’s spiritual leader, orders her daughter to initiate Jake into their society.”

“Colonel Miles Quaritch, head of RDA’s private security force, promises Jake that the company will restore his legs if he gathers intelligence about the Na’vi and the clan’s gathering place, a giant arboreal called Hometree, on grounds that it stands above the richest deposit of unobtanium in the area. When Grace learns of this, she transfers herself, Jake, and Norm to an outpost. Over three months, Jake grows to sympathize with the natives. After Jake is initiated into the tribe, he and Neytiri choose each other as mates, and soon afterward, Jake reveals his change of allegiance when he attempts to disable a bulldozer that threatens to destroy a sacred Na’vi site. When Quaritch shows a video recording of Jake’s attack on the bulldozer to Administrator Parker Selfridge, and another in which Jake admits that the Na’vi will never abandon Hometree, Selfridge orders Hometree destroyed.”


 

Robin Hood (mythology)

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Per wikipedia: “Robin Hood (spelled Robyn Hode in older sources) is a heroic outlaw in English folklore, and, according to legend, was also a highly skilled archer and swordsman. Although such behaviour was not part of his original character, since the beginning of the 19th century he has become known for “robbing from the rich and giving to the poor”, assisted by a group of fellow outlaws known as his “Merry Men”. Traditionally, Robin Hood and his men are depicted wearing Lincoln green clothes. According to some accounts, the legend has its roots in the activities of actual medieval outlaws, or the ballads or tales that circulated about them.”


 

Sailor Mars (Sailor Moon)

SailorMars

Per wikipedia: “Sailor Mars is a fictional lead character in the Sailor Moon manga series written by Naoko Takeuchi. The alternate identity of Rei Hino (or Raye Hino in the English adaptations), a teenage Japanese schoolgirl and Shinto priestess, she belongs to the Sailor Soldiers, female supernatural fighters who the franchise’s main girl characters transform into to fulfill their duty of protecting the Solar System and the franchise’s eponymous protagonist from evil.”

“Sailor Mars is the second Sailor Soldier to be discovered by Sailor Moon and the secondary leader of the Sailor Soldiers after Sailor Venus. She possesses powers associated with fire, as well as psychic and spiritual ones.”


 

Susan Pevensie (The Chronicles of Narnia)

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Per wikipedia: “Susan Pevensie is a fictional character in C. S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia series. Susan is the elder sister and the second eldest Pevensie child. She appears in three of the seven books—as a child in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and Prince Caspian, and as an adult in The Horse and His Boy. She is also mentioned in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader and The Last Battle. During her reign at the Narnian capital of Cair Paravel, she is known as Queen Susan the Gentle or Queen Susan of the Horn. She was the only Pevensie that survived the train wreck (because she was not on the train or at the station) on Earth which sent the others to Narnia after The Last Battle.”


 

William Tell (mythology)

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Per wikipedia: “William Tell (in the four languages of Switzerland: German: Wilhelm Tell; French: Guillaume Tell; Italian: Guglielmo Tell; Romansh: Guglielm Tell) is a folk hero of Switzerland. His legend is recorded in a late 15th-century Swiss chronicle.”

“It is set in the period of the original foundation of the Old Swiss Confederacy in the early 14th century. According to the legend, Tell—an expert marksman with the crossbow—assassinated Gessler, a tyrannical reeve of Habsburg Austria positioned in Altdorf, Uri.”

“Along with Arnold Winkelried, Tell is a central figure in Swiss patriotism as it was constructed during the Restoration of the Confederacy after the Napoleonic era.”

Click to Retweet: Archers of Legend at http://wp.me/p31Xf4-GS via @Nimpentoad